Discussion:
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
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Fred Greer
2012-06-12 19:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?

Here are some of the worst; it is up to you to judge which one wins the
dubious prize of being *the* worst.

In no particular order, the candidates are:

Starfleet, Star Trek.

Warp cores explode at the drop of the proverbial hat. Holodecks routinely
malfunction and kill people. New components are likely to attract
unwanted attention:
* A plasma conduit brought "interphasic" creatures that started eating
the crew.
* A new sensor system attracted alien abductors who killed one crewmember.
Torpedos lack a feature that only arms them after they've traveled a
ways. Soliton waves blow up the ships they're supposed to carry and can
blast chunks off of whole planets.

Starfleet, Star Wars

Pits without safety railings. Pits without safety railings. Reactor cores
that can easily be caused to explode. Pits without safety railings.
Dangerous, unshielded energy beams. Lack of collision avoidance radar on
standard class Star Destroyers. Pits without safety railings. Machinery
without emergency stop buttons. Pits without safety railings. And did I
mention pits without safety railings?

The Asgard, Stargate: SG-1

Thor's Hammer makes no attempt to be survivable by friendly Free Jaffa
and is badly designed anyway. The Goa'uld sometimes employ human slaves
not dependent on a symbiote, and Jaffa can survive a short while after
losing theirs, and the thing is easily disabled with a single staff
blast. And what would it do if a Tok'ra got caught by it?!

Asgard time dilation devices are too easily put in reverse by whatever
they're supposed to imprison.

The computer/factory system has no security to speak of. Anyone can walk
up to one and order a Replicator immune to ARG weapons and it will
merrily comply, producing something very likely to eat it, whatever
facility it's in, and eventually the rest of the galaxy it's in.

The Ancients, Stargate: SG-1 and Stargate: Atlantis

Oh, where do I begin?

Well, let's see what they left lying around in an unsafe state. A time-
loop-inducing gadget and at least *two* functioning time machines, none
of them with so much as a password lockout. A thing that blows up any
desired Stargate. The Dakkara device, which can Genesis Wave a whole
fucking galaxy for anyone who manages to find it and push a few wrong
buttons.

Then there's Project Arcturus, which they just left intact, with no
warning saying "Dangerous and can't be made to work" let alone "push this
button and this planet has a 50/50 chance of exploding". The gun on the
roof also has no friend/foe discrimination, nor in "safety valve" mode
does it just shoot straight up, or into a nearby mountainside, or
something. No, it will actively try to kill the friendlies that are
trying to flee the exploding planet!

We also have a killer holographic knight or two and a fucking fire-
breathing dragon, as well as a number of other deadly booby-traps here
and there. These are noteworthy, though, mainly because they're less
dangerous than the stuff they left lying around that *wasn't*
intentionally a booby trap.

I might also mention the time dilation bubble for meditating and
ascending in, which is unlabeled (of course), is not intended to be
escapable if you stumble in by accident (of course), and can conjure up
deadly monsters from peoples' minds like the alien thingy in Forbidden
Planet.

Oh, and there's the radiation-emitting thing that is unlabeled (of
course), kills within a day or so of cumulative exposure (of course), and
though its primary use seems to be to make a particular brain parasite
retract so it's surgically removable, does not come complete with a
sterile operating theatre with proper implements and nursing staff, oh
no, just a dank humid cave crawling with moss and bugs.

Then there's the Attero Device. The bottle doesn't mention the nasty side
effects, such as exploding stargates, and you have to risk electrocution
to turn the darn thing off. And they just left it lying around, as usual.

Of course, they littered at least two galaxies with face-hugging
Repository thingys that will kill most people that get too close, if they
can't find Asgard or Ancient help for their Repository-induced brain-
breakdown condition quickly enough.

Then there's Arthur's Mantle, which could render someone unable to get at
any food or drink and had no clear instructions how to turn *it* off.
(How they could get at any *oxygen* has never been adequately explained.
Or if they were breathing the same air as before, why they couldn't also
make sounds in that air by moving its molecules a bit differently.)

Atlantis alone was full of dangerously broken, un-warning-labeled
gadgets. Let's see -- a cask holding a deadly energy-absorbing black
cloud creature; a thing that zaps people and causes them to explode after
a while; the Ascend-O-Matic 9000 which will kill those not sufficiently
prepared and has no "undo" command; etc. The engines had a dangerous
experimental mode that might have blown up the city; it could be
submerged but did not (originally, before MORE TIME TRAVEL!) have a
failsafe to surface it if power got low; and the drones launched by the
chair could be dangerously unpredictable with an inexperienced user.

ZPMs could too easily be induced to go bang. As with anything of the
Ancients capable of going bang, "bang" means "kiss the nearest planet or
three goodbye".

And then there's the Stargates themselves. Oh, God, the Stargates!

Go in the wrong side = vaporized.

Go in the receiving gate = vaporized.

Stand right in front of a gate when it's activated (including if it
suddenly receives an intergalactic phone call) = vaporized.

Go into a gate when the other end is obstructed badly enough = vaporized.
(Had these guys ever heard of the concept of "bouncing" an undeliverable
message back to the sender?!)

Get stuck halfway in an active gate for too long = vaporized, or maybe
explosive decompression.

Failsafes made it hard for someone with a normal DHD/gate hookup to time
travel or put unstable elements in a star's core but DHDs tended to get
lost or broken and all kinds of jerry-rigged replacements lacked the
failsafes -- maybe they should have been in the *gates themselves*?!

No failsafe for dialing a gate near a black hole, though!

More mundanely, each gate was a 64-ton freestanding narrow-based vertical
thingy. And you thought vending machines potentially falling on people
was a hazard.

Atlantis's gate had a forcefield, but this allowed radio signals through.
Computer viruses have at least twice infected the dialing civilization
from a receiving one that sent a hostile signal through.

A lot of gates near Atlantis were in space, and lots of gates in both
galaxies were in environments hostile to biological life forms, but there
was no MALP-like device dispenser near any of them or even in Atlantis;
only on Destiny did they bother with anything like that. Or having the
DHD able to talk to the other end, confirm whether there was a DHD there
with enough power for at least one dial-back, or find out from the remote
DHD the environmental conditions on the other side. You'd think such a
feature would be basic and obvious.

And, of course, no technology of the Ancients is ever complete without
the capability of going kablooey with nuclear-bomb-level yields from
various insults that are relatively easily delivered.
Mason Barge
2012-06-12 20:26:03 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:19:35 +0000 (UTC), Fred Greer
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Gotta' go with Firefly.
Captain Infinity
2012-06-13 04:20:12 UTC
Permalink
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Mason Barge
On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:19:35 +0000 (UTC), Fred Greer
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Gotta' go with Firefly.
Firefly wasn't sci-fi.


**
Captain Infinity
Your Name
2012-06-13 06:27:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Infinity
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Mason Barge
On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:19:35 +0000 (UTC), Fred Greer
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Gotta' go with Firefly.
Firefly wasn't sci-fi.
Yes it was.




Another Star Wars example is the Empire not installing shields. The Rebel
fighters have them, but the TIE Fighters don't.
Captain Infinity
2012-06-13 12:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Your Name
Post by Captain Infinity
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Mason Barge
On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:19:35 +0000 (UTC), Fred Greer
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Gotta' go with Firefly.
Firefly wasn't sci-fi.
Yes it was.
No. Firefly was a Western with bizarre "production values".


**
Captain Infinity
David Johnston
2012-06-13 13:44:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Infinity
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Your Name
Post by Captain Infinity
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Mason Barge
On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:19:35 +0000 (UTC), Fred Greer
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Gotta' go with Firefly.
Firefly wasn't sci-fi.
Yes it was.
No. Firefly was a Western with bizarre "production values".
Any sci-fi show can be described as being part of some other genre.
David Johnston
2012-06-13 13:43:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Infinity
Once Upon A Time,
Post by Mason Barge
On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:19:35 +0000 (UTC), Fred Greer
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Gotta' go with Firefly.
Firefly wasn't sci-fi.
Well technically it was Fox, but...
HGH-17
2012-06-12 20:55:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred Greer
Starfleet, Star Trek.
Warp cores explode at the drop of the proverbial hat. Holodecks routinely
malfunction and kill people. New components are likely to attract
* A plasma conduit brought "interphasic" creatures that started eating
the crew.
* A new sensor system attracted alien abductors who killed one crewmember.
Torpedos lack a feature that only arms them after they've traveled a
ways. Soliton waves blow up the ships they're supposed to carry and can
blast chunks off of whole planets.
Don't forget that sometime between the 21st and 24th centuries they
apparently un-invented household smoke detectors, and as a result all
the Federation's transporter beams and all the Federation's
"fire-suppression systems" couldn't save half of Picard's family from an
ordinary house fire.

There have also been people slipping and falling and drowning in shallow
pools of water at various times on Trek, which you'd think would be
nearly always survivable in a civilization with all that high-tech gear.
Barry Margolin
2012-06-12 21:17:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by HGH-17
Post by Fred Greer
Starfleet, Star Trek.
Warp cores explode at the drop of the proverbial hat. Holodecks routinely
malfunction and kill people. New components are likely to attract
* A plasma conduit brought "interphasic" creatures that started eating
the crew.
* A new sensor system attracted alien abductors who killed one crewmember.
Torpedos lack a feature that only arms them after they've traveled a
ways. Soliton waves blow up the ships they're supposed to carry and can
blast chunks off of whole planets.
Don't forget that sometime between the 21st and 24th centuries they
apparently un-invented household smoke detectors
Don't forget circuit breakers.
--
Barry Margolin
Arlington, MA
Ubiquitous
2012-06-13 00:53:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Barry Margolin
Post by HGH-17
Post by Fred Greer
Starfleet, Star Trek.
Warp cores explode at the drop of the proverbial hat. Holodecks routinely
malfunction and kill people. New components are likely to attract
* A plasma conduit brought "interphasic" creatures that started eating
the crew.
* A new sensor system attracted alien abductors who killed one crewmember.
Torpedos lack a feature that only arms them after they've traveled a
ways. Soliton waves blow up the ships they're supposed to carry and can
blast chunks off of whole planets.
Don't forget that sometime between the 21st and 24th centuries they
apparently un-invented household smoke detectors
Don't forget circuit breakers.
Well, ones that don't explode in fiery pyrotechics, anyway.
--
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
Your Name
2012-06-13 01:10:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by HGH-17
Post by Fred Greer
Starfleet, Star Trek.
Warp cores explode at the drop of the proverbial hat. Holodecks routinely
malfunction and kill people. New components are likely to attract
* A plasma conduit brought "interphasic" creatures that started eating
the crew.
* A new sensor system attracted alien abductors who killed one crewmember.
Torpedos lack a feature that only arms them after they've traveled a
ways. Soliton waves blow up the ships they're supposed to carry and can
blast chunks off of whole planets.
Don't forget that sometime between the 21st and 24th centuries they
apparently un-invented household smoke detectors, and as a result all
the Federation's transporter beams and all the Federation's
"fire-suppression systems" couldn't save half of Picard's family from an
ordinary house fire.
It was probably an old French farm house that hadn't been fully modernised
(maybe on purpose), had bad wiring, etc. :-)
BTR1701
2012-06-13 00:39:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Don Bruder
2012-06-13 02:03:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Eh... W-Y ITSELF wasn't all that unsafe, but there's no question that
external factors did make for a less than safe work environment. (How
can they be accused of being unsafe when they've got no idea that
there's a shipful of alien eggs laying around, y'know?)
--
Email shown is deceased. If you would like to contact me by email, please
post something that makes it obvious in this or another group you see me
posting in with a "how to contact you" address, and I'll get back to you.
Arthur Lipscomb
2012-06-13 02:33:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by BTR1701
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Eh... W-Y ITSELF wasn't all that unsafe, but there's no question that
external factors did make for a less than safe work environment. (How
can they be accused of being unsafe when they've got no idea that
there's a shipful of alien eggs laying around, y'know?)
At least you can see the dangerous nature of the other examples, A
Weyland-Yutani android is designed to be undetectable to the
unsuspecting employees that might get murdered once it's determined
"crew expendable."


Honorable mention should probably go to OCP which routine shoots and
desecrates the corpses of their own employees. They even allow the use
of mini nukes without proper safety precautions to keep them from being
detonated inside the building. I'm pretty sure OSHA frowns on that too.
Actually with Detroit on the verge of bankruptcy reality may be close
to mirroring fiction soon.
BTR1701
2012-06-13 02:47:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by Don Bruder
Post by BTR1701
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Eh... W-Y ITSELF wasn't all that unsafe, but there's no question that
external factors did make for a less than safe work environment. (How
can they be accused of being unsafe when they've got no idea that
there's a shipful of alien eggs laying around, y'know?)
At least you can see the dangerous nature of the other examples, A
Weyland-Yutani android is designed to be undetectable to the
unsuspecting employees that might get murdered once it's determined
"crew expendable."
Honorable mention should probably go to OCP which routine shoots and
desecrates the corpses of their own employees. They even allow the use
of mini nukes without proper safety precautions to keep them from being
detonated inside the building. I'm pretty sure OSHA frowns on that too.
Actually with Detroit on the verge of bankruptcy reality may be close
to mirroring fiction soon.
And then there's Umbrella. I don't think there's much need for a
detailed explanation of why Umbrella won't be getting the OSHA stamp of
approval any time soon.
shawn
2012-06-13 02:51:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Global Dynamics (Eureka) would rank right up at the top because
everyone one of their brilliant scientists comes up with devices that
can kill everyone in the town or even the planet on a regular basis.
It's only through good luck that they haven't killed everyone (or
maybe it is the writers saving everyone.)
Adam H. Kerman
2012-06-13 02:59:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by BTR1701
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Global Dynamics (Eureka) would rank right up at the top because
everyone one of their brilliant scientists comes up with devices that
can kill everyone in the town or even the planet on a regular basis.
It's only through good luck that they haven't killed everyone (or
maybe it is the writers saving everyone.)
They have one guy in town with common sense and heroic duty of self
sacrifice, something none of the scientists are willing to do.
Your Name
2012-06-13 04:10:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by BTR1701
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
I'd have to say Weyland-Yutani ranks right up there as one of the more
dangerous workplace environments.
Global Dynamics (Eureka) would rank right up at the top because
everyone one of their brilliant scientists comes up with devices that
can kill everyone in the town or even the planet on a regular basis.
It's only through good luck that they haven't killed everyone (or
maybe it is the writers saving everyone.)
Didn't they kill off everyone already? I've only seen a few episodes, but
I seem to recall them resetting time and killing off at least some people.
Ubiquitous
2012-06-13 00:53:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred Greer
Starfleet, Star Wars
Pits without safety railings. Pits without safety railings. Reactor cores
that can easily be caused to explode. Pits without safety railings.
Dangerous, unshielded energy beams. Lack of collision avoidance radar on
standard class Star Destroyers. Pits without safety railings. Machinery
without emergency stop buttons. Pits without safety railings. And did I
mention pits without safety railings?
How about that open area along the path where the Death Star's planet-destroying
ray is emitted?

For that matter, there's that "design flaw" which allows someone to send a
missile down a flume shaft that causes a Deathstar to explode...
--
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
number6
2012-06-13 13:31:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred Greer
Who has the worst OSHA compliance in sci-fi?
Here are some of the worst; it is up to you to judge which one wins the
dubious prize of being *the* worst.
Starfleet, Star Trek.
Starfleet is probably the most compliant ... I would imagine their
training manuals, written procedures, documentation and other
ancillary paperwork are beyond reproach ... meaning OSHA would give
them an A ... and still give them an A despite all the disasters for
worker safety that you pointed out ...

I know a company that had a worker death .. and a full scale OSHA
inspection as a result ... they spent all of 5 minutes looking at the
scene of the accident ... then spent the rest of the day going over
paperwork ... The company was cited for quite a number of minor
violations ... like signature missing here ... update overdue on this
procedure ... and absolutely NOTHING that involved any cause of or
future prevention of a recurrence ...

There is a world of difference between "providing the worker a safe
working environment" ... and OSHA ...
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